Easter Rising & Ireland under Martial Law, 1916-1921

Easter Rising & Ireland under Martial Law, 1916-1921

This unique collection of 75,000 records includes reports and military intelligence detailing the events of Easter week 1916, and sheds light on the brutality experienced in Ireland during the War of Independence

Discover life on the street during the Irish War of Independence

Discover life on the street during the Irish War of Independence
Irish Citizen Army soldiers poised on the rooftops of Dublin

The Easter Rising & Ireland under Martial Law, 1916-1921 collection offers a unique insight into some of the most significant events in Ireland’s history. Featuring extraordinarily detailed on the ground coverage, these 75,000 records reveal the War of Independence as it was experienced on the streets of Ireland’s cities.

Digitised from original British Army records held by The National Archives in Kew, the collection sheds light on the brutality of life under martial law in Ireland. Confidential military intelligence demonstrates how events under the occupying military served to galvanise support for the rebels in a conflict which saw three civilians killed for every rebel, and more than 3000 people killed or injured in total. 

Eye-witness accounts, interviews with civilians, and reports of the trials and executions of the leaders of the Rising demonstrate the brutality and chaos which followed the announcement of martial law by the Lord Lieutenant in 1916. The lives of ordinary citizens were thrown into turmoil, and 25,000 search and raid records show the efforts of the military and police to discover arms, ammunition and seditious material, as well as their search for individuals associated with Sinn Féin, Irish Citizen Army, Irish Volunteers and the Irish Republican Army.

How to use the Easter Rising records

How to use the Easter Rising records

The Easter Rising & Ireland Under Martial Law 1916-1921 collection contains over 75,000 records, ranging from riot reports to first-hand accounts. Make sure to get the most out of your search with our quick guide...

5 things to look for in the Rising records

5 things to look for in the Rising records

There are over 75,000 previously confidential records, including the names of over 5,000 women and 42,000 men. Among these are secret communications, witness statements and 25,000 search and raid reports....

Tips & tricks for searching the Irish records

Tips & tricks for searching the Irish records Tips & tricks for searching the Irish records

In this essential webinar, Irish genealogy expert Brian Donovan presents Findmypast's unrivalled collection of Irish records, offering tips, tricks and insights into what makes it the biggest and best online. If you are researching your Irish ancestry, this is the best place to start.

Your top 8 questions on Irish records

Your top 8 questions on Irish records

There are some common stumbling blocks when it comes to Irish family history, so we've gathered your most burning questions, and put our experts to work...

Search our free Irish records

Search our free Irish records
Easter Rising, Internment camps and prisons, 1920-1922 (Pieces 139-141)

 

 

Our Easter Rising collection is free to use for 10 days.

 

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