The amount of information listed varies, but the 1911 census records usually include at least the following information about your ancestor:

  • Where an individual lived
  • Their age at the time of the census
  • Who (what relatives) they were living with
  • Their place of birth
  • Occupation
  • Details of any guests on the night of the census
  • Details of any servants they had

    Also, depending on an individual's circumstances, additional information could include:

  • Whether they were an employee or employer
  • Precise details of the industry or service they worked in
  • Details of nationality
  • Duration of their current marriage
  • Number of children born to that marriage
  • Number of children still living, and the number who had died
    * Details of any illnesses or conditions each family member had, and the date these began


    On the 1911 census transcriptions, you'll also be able to see any recorded details of children born to women in prison who were aged three or under at the time of the census.

    For the first time ever, we've made the infirmity column of the 1911 census available for you to view. See how your ancestors reported your family's Illnesses and conditions and the age at which these began. This can provide a revealing insight into the previously censored health of your family in 1911, as well as your ancestors' views of their relations' well being.

    As well as searching for a person, you can also search the 1911 census by address - ideal for tracing your house history or exploring the local history of an area.

    By noting how many households there were in a building, and whether the household included servants or boarders or visitors, you can gain insight into the social circumstances of the family.
  • Discover more about the 1911 UK census

    The 1911 census for England and Wales was taken on the night of Sunday 2 April, 1911. The count included all individual households, plus institutions such as prisons, workhouses, naval vessels and merchant vessels, and it also attempted to make an approximate count of the homeless. The census also includes records for the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man, Royal Navy ships at sea, and overseas military establishments.

    Many new questions were added to the 1911 census to address government concerns at the time, which make the 1911 census particularly rich in information for anyone researching genealogy. More information and search tips can be found on the census search page.